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Obtaining Help - Treatment

Explaining Drug Addiction

Substance dependency is a chronic illness that is identified by uncontrollable substance seeking and use, regardless of the harmful effects and alterations in the brain that can be permanent. These alterations in the brain can cause dangerous behaviour in a person who uses drugs. Substance dependency is also a relapsing illness. Relapsing is when a person starts to use drugs again after he/she attempted to quit.


Using drugs out of one's volition is the road that leads to drug addiction. However, the mental strength to decide whether to use drugs or not is eroded with time. The desire to search for and make use of drugs will now rely on a very huge urge. This is generally because of the impacts of long haul drug exposure on brain work. The parts of the brain messed up by the drug dependency are the ones dealing with recompense and inspiration, knowledge and recollection, and responsible actions.

Addiction is a sickness that influences both the mind and conduct.


Is There Treatment For Drug Dependency?

Yes, yet it's not simple. Since dependency is a chronic illness, individuals cannot just quit using the substances for a day or two and be cured of it. Most users require repeated or long-term care to quit using it altogether and get their lives back.


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The addicts must be assisted to achieve certain things through the treatment for addiction, and they include:

  • stop using the substances
  • Remaining clean
  • be a productive member at work, in society and in the family

Values Of Successful Rehabilitation

These principles must be involved, if any efficient treatment program must be arrived at, as opined by several scientific researches since mid-1970s:

  • Dependency is an intricate, but treatable illness which affects the functioning of the brain and behaviour.
  • No single treatment is appropriate for everybody.
  • Treatment should be made available to people whenever they need it.
  • Viable treatment addresses the greater part of the patient's needs, not only his or her drug intake.
  • It is extremely important to remain under treatment for a very long period of time.
  • Advising and other behavioural treatments are the most usually used types of treatment.
  • Together with psychological treatment, pharmaceutical drugs are also administered.
  • A treatment plan must be evaluated frequently and adapted to suit the changing requirements of the patient.
  • Mental illnesses associated with drug dependency need to be treated too.
  • Therapeutically helped detoxification is just the primary phase of treatment.
  • Patients do not necessarily enrol for treatment by choice.
  • Drug usage amid treatment must be observed constantly.
  • The treatment programs must ensure that patients are tested for tuberculosis, hepatitis B and C, HIV/AIDS, and other infectious ailments, while they should also be informed about the best way to avoid contacting those.

How Is Drug Addiction Treated?

Rewarding treatment has a few stages:

  • Detoxification (the way a body is cleaned of toxins and drug residue)
  • Behavioural advising
  • medication (for tobacco, alcohol or opioid dependency)
  • Diagnosis and management mental illness associated with drug addiction such as hopelessness and nervousness
  • Avoiding relapse by providing long term follow up care

Success could be achieved through different types of care that come with customised treatment method and follow-up options.


Depending on the level of need, mental health services should be added to the medical aspect of any treatment. Follow-up care may comprise group or family-based recuperation supportive networks.


How Drug Addiction Treatment Incorporates Medications?

Meds can be utilized to oversee withdrawal manifestations, anticipate backslide and treat comorbid conditions.

  • Withdrawal During the detoxification process, medication helps suppress the physical reactions. Detoxification is only an initial stage in the process; it is not a "treatment" on its own. Patient who doesn't get any further treatment after detoxification as a rule resumes their drug usage. According to one study of treatment centres, medications were utilised in close to 80 per cent of detoxifications (SAMHSA, 2014).
  • Preventing Relapse Medicines used in the detoxing programme help the brain to restore to its normal functions easier and stop the desire for the drug. Medications are accessible for management of opioid (heroin, prescription pain relievers), tobacco (nicotine), and alcohol dependence. Scientists are busy to develop other medications to treat cannabis (marijuana) and stimulant (methamphetamine and cocaine) dependency. Treatment for every substance they have ever abused will be necessary for those that use multiple drugs.

How Are Behavioural Therapies Used To Treat Drug Addiction?

Patients are assisted by behavioural therapies to:

  • change his/her behaviour and attitude related to the substance use
  • Upturn healthy life abilities
  • Endure with different types of treatment, for example, medication

A patient can get treatment in several different environments using different approaches.

In an outpatient treatment programme, the recovering addict attends therapy sessions on appointed times. Personal or group drug counselling or both of them are included in majority of the programs.


Treatments available in some of these treatment sessions address psychological issues like:

  • cognitive-behavioural therapy, which helps patients recognize, avoid, and cope with the situations in which they are most likely to use drugs
  • Multidimensional family therapy in which not just the patient but also his/her family is involved able to sort out a lot of things and help the whole family cope with the changes and heal together
  • Motivational interviewing has been used to prepare a patient to accept their problem and wants to change their actions by seeking help
  • motivational incentives (contingency management), where abstinence from drugs is rewarded and motivated with positive reinforcements

sometimes, intensive treatments that involve several outpatient sessions every week is given at first. After the completion of the in-depth treatment, a patient moves to frequent outpatient treatment, which does not meet as regularly and for fewer hours every week to assist with maintaining his/her recovery.


Residential/inpatient treatment can also be extremely successful, particularly for patients with more serious issues (including co-occurring conditions). A licensed inpatient treatment centre provides round-the-clock, structured and comprehensive care, that includes safe accommodation as well as medical attention. Inpatient treatment facilities can use many therapeutic approaches and are usually working toward assisting the patient after treatment to maintain a drug free, crime free lifestyle.


Residential treatment setting samples:

  • Therapeutic communities which are exceedingly organised programs in which patients stay at a home, normally for 6 to 12 months. The whole group, including treatment staff and those in recuperation, approach as key specialists of progress, affecting the patient's states of mind, comprehension and practices related with drug utilisation.
  • Shorter-term residential treatment, which ordinarily concentrates on detoxification and also giving early extensive counselling and readiness for treatment in a community based setting.
  • Recovery housing, which is normally an aftermath of inpatient or residential treatment, and where patients are given limited term housing under an expert watch. The recovery housing programme provides a bridge for the patients between the long term inpatient facility and re-joining the society; patients are helped to prepare for life on the outside by enabling them to look for jobs and learn how to take care and budget their money.

Problems Of Re-Admission

The excessive urge to take drugs could be "triggered" by several factors within the brain, as the workings of the brain is altered by drug abuse. It is key for patients in treatment, particularly those treated at prison or inpatient facilities, to learn how to identify, steer clear of, and deal with triggers that they are most likely to experience after treatment.