Schedule: Monday - Sunday - 00:00 - 24:00

12 Step Plans

The Goal Of The 12 Steps

The 12 steps and traditions, known as the Alcoholics Anonymous, is one of the earliest programs designed to help people through recovery and is regarded by many as the yardstick for assessing any program that claims to help people break free from reliance on any substance or alcohol.


This was originally created by the Alcoholics Anonymous group in order to beat alcohol addiction. It gained its popularity from its early successful implementation in beating alcohol abuse that the drug rehab treatment adapted its own version of the 12-step program. Many people who have no affiliation to any religious group also adopt the program despite the spiritual undertone of the program. It has become known as a guiding fundamental summarizing the course of action in recovering from any compulsive and dependency to commonly abused substances.


The 12 Step approaches are applied to numerous dependence and obsessive conducts going from Cocaine Anonymous to Debtors Anonymous.


The Effectivity Of The Model

Due to the anonymous nature installed by the AA, and lack of provided information, it is difficult to know how effective the 12-step guide actually is. Nevertheless, the popularity as well as success stories recounting recovery from addiction indicate milestone progress and position of the program.

Those who display sincerity in their attempt to break their reliance on alcohol and drugs receive the needed assistance from the 12-step plan. The regularly scheduled gatherings and the sponsorship system show its impact on people who had successfully beaten the problem.


The Twelve Step Plan With Alcoholics Anonymous

Recovery from an addiction is a lifelong mission, so there is no right or wrong way to go about the 12 step program, the patient needs to figure out the best way that will work for them. Some of the steps discussed in the program are repeated severally by those using the program.

The 12 Steps detailed by Alcoholic Anonymous are the following:

  • We gave up to alcohol - our lives have become uncontrollable.
  • We are convinced that a greater entity can take us back to normality.
  • We have decided to offer ourselves to our God.
  • Made a full and thorough inventory of our moral capability.
  • We open up to God, to ourselves and to other humans the errors of our ways and the wrongdoings we have done.
  • Were prepared to have God eradicate all these flaws of personality.
  • We humbly ask that he removes our shortcomings.
  • Ready to make up with people we have offended after writing their names down.
  • Seek restoration of broken relationships caused by addiction without strings attached by checking out with the person first.
  • Accept we are at fault whenever we realize that during personal assessment.
  • Continue to implore the blessing of our almighty God through prayers and reflections to further improve our communication with him.
  • It is our determination to teach alcoholics our resolution and make use of them in our daily lives because we have come to have a deeper understanding of our spirituality because of the steps.

Ready to Get Help?

CALL US NOW ON 0800 246 1509



The 12 Expected Practices

While the 12 steps is directed to each alcoholic, the 12 traditions is directed to the group. Alcoholics Anonymous are directed according to the principles in a book known as the Big Book.

These traditions have been used by some groups that use the 12 steps as part of their method to help people overcome addiction.

Book your meeting by getting in touch with us on 0800 246 1509.


The 12 traditions are listed below:

  • Individual recovery hinges on AA unity, leading to the organization's overall objective.
  • God, with his love, is our principal source of instruction in this group according to how He instructs and treats the group.
  • Our own leaders are but disciples; they do not rule over us.
  • There is but 1 requirement to enter the AA, the need to quit drinking.
  • Each group should be independent apart from things which can involve other groups or AA.
  • Every group has one important aim - bring the message to any alcoholic that is suffering from alcohol addiction.
  • AA discourages lending finances or approving other outside facilities to benefit from the organization's structure to avoid conflict of interest that could distract the group from pursuing the overall group's common purpose.
  • AA groups are self-supported and should not solicit outside financial assistance.
  • We should maintain our "non professionalism", but the service centres we offer can employ specialist workers.
  • AA shouldn't be prearranged; we may form service boards or teams which are in charge of those they help.
  • The group name should never be involved in anything outside its jurisdiction because the group is neutral to external issues.
  • When handling media issues, we remain anonymous because we keep self-promotion at arm's length while advocating attracting people through our programs.
  • Our principles come first before personalities, our anonymity lays the foundation of our traditions as a group.

Looking For Treatment

Do you want to overcome your dependence on alcohol and other drugs by using a proven 12-step program? There are over 50,000 national AA groups, and thousands more anonymous addiction groups for specific drugs, you are sure to find the right one for you.